Reviews

…The first portion of the book covers standard territory for dinosaur titles. What a dinosaur is. Early dinosaur discoveries. How fossils form. But what really makes Dinosaurs of the British Isles an essential title for any Mesozoic fanatic is its exhaustive exploration of dinosaurs unique to the UK. Starting with the Late Triassic maybe-dino Saltopus, the book moves upwards in time through the Late Cretaceous, listing dinosaurs according to the rock units in which they are found. Each of these sections are absolutely packed with photos of fossils, skeletal reconstructions, and life restorations by Tamura, who continues to improve as he draws his way through the tree of prehistoric life. There’s no better single resource for catching up with Britain’s dinosaurs. Full review … Full review...

LAELAPS 2015, Brian Switek

... Over 400 pages long, beautifully produced and designed and absolutely stuffed full of colour photos and life reconstructions, it’s a lavish and comprehensive guide to the Mesozoic dinosaurs of Britain - the most complete version of this sort of thing published so far. Skeletal reconstructions by Greg Paul, Scott Hartman and Jaime Headden also appear throughout, as do photos of locations, specimens in the field, shots of specimens on display, and palaeomaps. Full review...

Tetrapod Zoology 2015, Dr Darren Naish

...a truly encyclopaedic coverage of all British dinosaur species. It is absolutely up to date on the taxonomy of the material, with all the new names recently introduced for British ornithischians included. Search as I might, I found no omissions: all British dinosaurs are there. If Britain had badlands we would be the dinosaur centre of the universe. This is a thorough, scholarly work presented in a format accessible to everyone. Every dinosaur worker in the world should have a copy. Full review...

Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association, (2014) Dr David Martill (Portsmouth University)

. . . a gloriously illustrated and comprehensive chronicle of dinosaur bones, teeth, and footprints from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. . . . Dinosaurs of the British Isles is easily the single best reference on British dinosaurs that has ever been produced. It is a one-stop resource for whatever you want to know about those dinosaurs that once called Britain home. This book was clearly an enormous amount of work. Full review (.pdf)...

Palaeontological Association Newsletter, 87. (2014) Dr Steve Brusatte (University of Edinburgh)

...Every once in a while a book comes along that manages to span that bridge between professional academics and the general reader. A book that provides insight and scientific accuracy whilst at the same time intriguing and entertaining the lay person. Such a book is the excellent "Dinosaurs of the British Isles" written by palaeontologist Dean Lomax in collaboration with talented palaeoartist Nobumichi Tamura. The first academic, published description of the fossils of a dinosaur date all the way back to 1824 (Megalosaurus bucklandii). This new publication sets out to collate information on the Dinosauria and then catalogues the one hundred species or so known from the geology of the British Isles. The Reverend William Buckland, (the person responsible for that 1824 paper), would no doubt be impressed by the depth of information the authors have provided. Full review...

Ezine Articles, August 2014 By Mike Walley

...This book has been painstakingly researched and prepared. It has taken something like three years to write and it has been produced with a diverse audience in mind. Academics and researchers will no doubt find this book an excellent reference. The general reader with an interest in fossils and history will appreciate the clearly labelled diagrams and concise writing style. The skilfully created prehistoric scenes by Nobumichi Tamura and James McKay will help to inspire young dinosaur fans eager to learn more about palaeontology... The book extends to over 400 pages and provides a truly comprehensive account of those members of the Dinosauria whose fossils have been found in the British Isles. There is even a section on “dinosaur hotspots” and a useful glossary to help explain some of the scientific terms encountered in this book. Highly recommended. Full review...

Everything Dinosaur Blog, August 2014 By Mike Walley.

...Dean Lomax of Manchester University says Jurassic Britain was a “dinosaur paradise” with more than 100 different species on our shores, including three of the most glamorous and terrifying dinosaurs of them all, tyrannosaurs. Dean’s beautifully illustrated book Dinosaurs Of The British Isles introduces stegosaurs, ankylosaurs, ornithopods and possibly the largest dinosaur ever found in Europe, a gigantic sauropod...nearly 200 years ago.--> This book covers every aspect of their lives. There are even photos of fossilised poo, with one cut open to reveal the bones eaten by the beastie which deposited it. And for those who think the only dinosaurs are trades union barons, take a look at your bird table. Full review...

The Daily Express, July 2014 By John Ingham.

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